Experienced, Professional, Cost-Effective Environmental Management Solutions

Serving Clients Nationwide

Sand County Environmental, Inc., is a nationally-recognized environmental engineering firm providing a full array of phytoremediation and traditional remediation solutions to private and public service sectors. Our work is most often conducted for owners of landfills, lenders, retail and wholesale agricultural chemical storage facilities, local and state governments, and other property owners where soil, groundwater, or stormwater management issues are of concern.

Phytoremediation

National leader in providing phytoremediation (plant-based) solutions for pollutants in soil, groundwater, and stormwater.

Ag-Chem Industry

Assisting ag-chem facilities manage environmental issues including facility design, stormwater management, and nutrient and pesticide remediation.

Solid Waste

Providing a range of investigation and monitoring services, including sustainable, on-site leachate management systems.

Environmental Services

Providing Phase I and Phase II ESAs, site investigations, remediations, due diligence, wetland services, and expert witness.

Wastewater/Engineered Wetlands

Alternative treatment systems and artificial wetlands to treat leachate, wastewater, and stormwater through the use of plants, soil, and microbes.

Project Gallery

Samples of work conducted by Sand County Environmental.

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Another SCE staff member completed their 40-hour Wetland Delineation training this week. Using a scientific approach to describe wetland hydrology, vegetation, and soils, we use US Army Corps of Engineer methods and protocols to legally define wetlands. Our expert biologists, hydrologists, and soil scientists are ready to take on your wetland delineation projects, whether in pristine natural areas, farm fields, or disturbed sites. ... See MoreSee Less

Another SCE staff member completed their 40-hour Wetland Delineation training this week. Using a scientific approach to describe wetland hydrology, vegetation, and soils, we use US Army Corps of Engineer methods and protocols to legally define wetlands. Our expert biologists, hydrologists, and soil scientists are ready to take on your wetland delineation projects, whether in pristine natural areas, farm fields, or disturbed sites.Image attachment

Identifying invasive plants isn’t always easy, and it’s made even more difficult when there are common lookalike plants.

Wild parsnip is an invasive plant of special concern. Adverse skin reactions can be triggered when the sap of broken parsnip plants (in leaves, stems and flowers) contacts the skin and is then exposed to sunlight. Reactions can vary from minor rashes to severe burns and scarring, so wild parsnip is a plant to be avoided.

Native golden alexander looks very similar to wild parsnip, so the two are often mistaken for one another. Both plants have similar flowers in umbels (umbrella-shaped flower arrangements).

Golden alexander is significantly smaller than wild parsnip when mature, growing only to 3 feet in height, with smaller leaves and smaller, looser, uneven flower clusters. Golden alexander also blooms first; wild parsnip blooms later in the season.

The shape of the plants' leaves can also be used to tell the two apart. Wild parsnip leaves are deep and forked with coarsely toothed edges; golden alexander leaves are finely toothed with pointed tips.

Learn more about wild parsnip on our website: dnr.wisconsin.gov/topic/Invasives/fact/WildParsnip
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